Public Safety Officer Sexual Harassment

Studies have shown that one-half to two-thirds of women in law enforcement experience some form of sexual harassment during the course of their career, while about 20 percent report experiencing sexually harassing behavior (commonly in the form of offensive comments and remarks) on an almost daily basis. Precise figures about reporting sexual harassment are difficult to obtain, but accurate estimates conclude that fewer than 25 percent of incidents are ever reported.

In the law enforcement community, there are many misunderstandings about what constitutes sexual harassment and what should be reported. Public safety officers and administrators could benefit from more frequent sexual harassment training and more open discussion throughout the country. Both male and female employees experience sexual harassment in the workplace, but many do not define it as such.

You don’t have to tolerate sexual harassment while on the job. Call Winer, McKenna & Burritt, LLP, today at (510) 433-1000 for a free consultation.

What Is Sexual Harassment? Is It The Same In Law Enforcement?

Sexual harassment is most often experienced as offensive comments, suggestive remarks, requests for sexual favors and inappropriate touching, but there are many other types of sexual harassment, including:

  • Repeated requests for dates or getting hit on
  • Unwanted and unwelcome attention
  • Offensive or obscene gestures
  • Leering or ogling looks
  • Offensive notes or invitations
  • Sexual advances
  • Sexual assault
  • Gender discrimination

Sexual harassment might be experienced somewhat differently from industry to industry, but the definitions of what should be reported and dealt with through remediation or legal steps are the same across industries.

How Should You Report Sexual Harassment?

Making a complaint or filing a claim can be intimidating. Fears that your co-workers or supervisor will treat you negatively, or that your career will be impacted negatively are not unrealistic. Retaliation is prevalent against public safety officers who file harassment complaints. A California attorney focusing on sexual harassment in the workplace should be consulted. Your employer can be held strictly liable if retaliation of any sort results from your complaint or if a supervisor at any level is involved as a perpetrator of the harassment.

Contact Winer, McKenna & Burritt, LLP

Our lawyers are top-rated sexual harassment litigators in California. We can help you understand the legal process in addition to your full rights and legal options. Email or call us at (510) 433-1000 in Oakland or Los Angeles. We pursue all cases on a contingency fee basis, and we offer free initial consultations.